Social Media and Content Marketing, Better Together

Social Media and Content Marketing, Better Together

Social media has come a long way in the marketing mix. It is now considered essential to a good marketing strategy; whether to increase exposure and traffic, to nurture loyalty, to generate leads, to improve search rankings or to provide marketplace insights.  At the same time, social media has a voracious appetite for content.  And as a result, content is being produced at a breathtaking rate.

For instance, it is commonly known that over 2,000,000 pieces of content are shared on Facebook every day. How can brands be disciplined and purposeful in their strategy- remaining visible in a dizzying array of content offerings of varying quality? A good content marketing strategy will generate smarter engagements, creating sustainable dialogs, thus increasing brands’ social impact.

Platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and others allow content to effectively reach their specific targets. They increase the content dissemination loop by offering marketers the possibility of readjusting old-style written content to each unique platform, repurposing it to fulfill every target’s expectation. I’ve heard it said, “Social media is gasoline and content marketing is fire.”  Content is the currency of trust in social.  And as a direct result of that trust and authenticity, content marketing, like a good friend, enhances the “social factor” of social media platforms. Consumers not only like and share content as a statement of their personalities and defined interests, but also because they believe the content consumed can be useful and interesting not only to them exclusively, but their social communities as well.  Even audiences have audiences.

Social media brought a new way to listen to audiences; that listening has entirely changed the way an industry produced content. In the past, publishers produced content based on industry trends. Today’s content is user-centric, defined by archetype and behaviors. But, is it really possible to foresee someone’s “content mood/mode” for the day? Therefore, social media becomes a hyper-sensitive and none too reflective content thermometer for marketers.

A good content marketing strategy is the best way to generate brand awareness, increase website impressions, generate qualified leads and improve website SERP (search engine result page) position. It is important to emphasize that a good content marketing strategy will: a) not be limited to written content only, but will use media tools to disseminate content through various social media platforms to increase target reach and content consumption; b) offer qualitative content based on the target’s necessity and taste; c) include superior publishers to boost distribution d) be rooted  in content consumption histories, live data, and channel checks, and e) be conscious that  a given cultural moment is not static.  On the contrary, there is flux between dominant, residual, and emergent cultural perspectives.

The increasingly intelligent hybridization of social media demonstrates purpose, earns trust with your audience and their audiences, and ultimately ships cases. Combining forces with content can provide social with the impact, credibility, and access to key audiences in new ways that social could not achieve on its own.

This article was first published on www.studioone.com. 

Dhouglas Carvalho has been working with digital marketing and online experience design for the past 6 years. Currently living in New York, he is a proud member of the CHR Group. Follow me on Twitter @dhouglasc

Social Media in 2015

Social Media in 2015

Duke University recently published a study on social media that forecasts an investment increase of 25% in social media campaigns within the next five years.The previous years of investment on social media has been proven effective when it comes to raise brand awareness, leads generation and target engagement, especially when associated with content marketing. But even with notable results companies argue they have not been able to calculate the precise ROI in their social media campaigns, especially in the B2B segment.

SM specialists throughout a heuristic method have been able to map the road so far generating efficient strategies. SM is an equivalent society in the connected digital world and it is constantly evolving and changing without prior notice. Therefore, experimenting and documenting is a must when it comes to planning effective future social media strategies.

Social Media campaigns are based on archetypes, behaviors and interests. Here lies the biggest challenge — to understand the human being behind the screen. What does he want today? Is he happy or sad? Does he need entertaining or focus reading? How should the editorial calendar be planned? In this time-liquid digital society, contents do not stay fresh for more than 72 hours — acting quick is a must. It has become impossible to administer a community without a professional dedicated only to this discipline.

2015 brings good tidings to marketers. New behavior tracking technologies are entering the market. They use e-mail tagging technology, enabled by cookies, that allow marketers to trace the Internet behavior of specific targets and cross-match similar behaviors to create archetype profiles. This technology will allow marketers to cluster targets by precise interest, maximizing campaign efforts. Social Media campaigns will no longer be planned by guesswork. It will be easier to bring together what we can describe as perfect communities, members grouped by interest, ideals and brand preference with precision. Community interaction will be the rule, not the exception.

This technology represents two sides of the coin — it helps marketers reach the next step in service evolution, precision of content. Meanwhile, service and products offered will be bigger than ever thought possible. However, we do not have enough laws to guarantee privacy integrity, leaving plenty of room to discuss the new silver lining of aggregating value or violating privacy. Privileged information might be used to ostracize minorities; thus increasing inequality. The future is undoubtedly here, but it remains a dark room with many corners to be explored.

Dhouglas Carvalho has been working with digital marketing and online experience design for the past 6 years. Currently living in New York, he is a proud member of the CHR Group. Follow me on Twitter @dhouglasc